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Notes From A Polite New Yorker: Labor's Love Lost

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I dream of the day when the outsourcing C.E.O. gets a brick through his living room window and four flat tires on his way to work.

This past Easter Sunday, my family ate heartily and discussed some of the current political and economic issues of the day. There may be better ways to wash down a tasty Easter ham than a lamentation on the state of the republic, but we haven't found it yet. Our conversation settled on how many pension holders have been screwed by their municipal or corporate overlords. 

The unofficial conclusion we reached over our Easter meal was that the United States is long overdue for a resurrected organized labor movement

Labor unions represent only about 11% of the American workforce, and a majority of union members today are government workers who can't strike. The upside to this is that a lot of government workers have very good, stable jobs that are safer and more lucrative than their non-government worker counterparts. But most workers are continually getting screwed.

The labor movement was spurred on by the large impact of industrialization, and it was designed to protect industrial laborers and tradesmen. It has not adapted to the changing economy. The majority of American workers today are not industrial tradesmen. 

If there was a viable labor movement in the U.S., I would have a real union to join. I work as a financial journalist. The company I work for actually cut our salaries years ago during the financial crisis. They technically restored the salary cuts years later, but haven't given raises since and continued to cut our pay in other ways, such as stopping all matching 401k contributions, gutting healthcare benefits, and the like. They've also done a lot of outsourcing. Employees with many years of service to the company under their belts were shown the door, their jobs shipped off to India. 

A labor union would have fought all of those things, but there is no labor union representing us. We are considered too "professional" to join a union, though not professional enough to be tossed aside like yesterday's garbage if some outsourcing shyster can save the company a few dollars. But we don't have much recourse since there is no collective bargaining going on. People vote with their feet and while people are leaving the company in droves, the rest of us there are spending our energies looking for other work rather than fighting a good fight (and since I need my job and have four mouths to feed, I'll kindly not mention the name of the company I work for here). 

I dream of the day when the outsourcing C.E.O. gets a brick through his living room window and four flat tires on his way to work. There should be real unions to contend with when companies want to cut pay, cut benefits or cut jobs. This isn't because I think the answer is some kind of socialist worker's paradise. To paraphrase what Winston Churchill said about democracy: Capitalism is the worst economic system there is except for all of the others. 

There seems to be a great illness of myopathy among our current class of capitalists. They think only in the short term and only in terms of the bottom line. I have no problem with businesses making hard decisions and scoring a healthy profit, but a lot of executives are not thinking ahead much farther than the next quarterly report. Sure, the slash-and-burn fiscal ass-fucking they've been giving American workers has increased profits now, but what kind of company are they going to have in five years? 

But our companies have pursued these policies, and the results are predictable. American capitalism no longer means industriousness and hard work, but rather golden parachutes and amorality. 

Just as democracy doesn't work without real political opposition, real capitalism doesn't work without American workers having some kind of say over their working lives. Labor unions were once the source of that power. They can be again.

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