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Notes From A Polite New Yorker: Brooklyn's Rapid Cultural Death Claims Two More

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Brooklyn stopped being an "up and coming" borough nearly 10 years ago. It's now an overrated playground for the wealthy and clueless.

It has taken Brooklyn less than a decade to achieve the kind of overpriced cultural rot that normally takes a generation in other places. 

There have been some very large events that illustrate this: the demolition of the beautiful Prospect Heights neighborhood to build the ugly Barclays Center being a landmark event that marks a shameful chapter in city history. 

Brooklyn wears its shame again as two very excellent music venues have found it necessary to close their doors. The Trash Bar and The Lake are two places where I've seen and played some of the best shows ever. Their closing demonstrates how lousy, overrated and overpriced Brooklyn has gotten. 

With the rapid rise of real estate in Manhattan, the outer boroughs became a refuge for the arts, and many music venues moved or set up in Brooklyn. 

The Trash Bar quickly became Brooklyn's home for punk rock shows that were chased out of Manhattan. Many of the great traditional punk shows that had made their place in Manhattan were now at the Trash Bar: Murphy's Law's St. Patrick's Day, Halloween, and New Year's Eve shows were held at The Trash Bar. When our band, Blackout Shoppers, had its 10th Anniversary show, it was at The Trash Bar. Some of our best shows were there. We were honored to play a tribute show to Norman Bates and the Showerheads' J. Garino there that included a reunion of The Six and Violence. The Bullys held their Johnny Heff tribute shows there after they lost their regular spot in Manhattan. For many years a picture of Johnny Heff, the Bully's guitar player who was a New York Firefighter who lost his life in the September 11 attacks, looked over the stage. 

Also in Brooklyn, at an address the owners prefer not to publish, is The Swamp, formerly known as The Lake, formerly known only by its street address. Not far from the Montrose stop of the L train, The Swamp is just a few blocks away from a major Brooklyn thoroughfare but in a quiet-looking, industrial area. 

It serves as a great example of how punk rock has been kept alive by DIY spaces. The Swamp was basically a very large apartment that was run as a venue by people who lived there. They built a stage and bleacher seating in a room that served as a performance space. It was a great punk rock venue like no other. 

When my wife and I got married, we threw a wedding celebration there that featured some of our favorite bands. Less than a year later, Blackout Shoppers held an album release concert there to mark the long overdue completion of our second album. The Swamp also hosted reggae and other shows, and it hosted combined punk and reggae shows that packed them in. It was an honor to play shows there and it will be sorely missed. 

Brooklyn stopped being an "up and coming" borough nearly 10 years ago. It's now an overrated playground for the wealthy and clueless. There are a few artists and enclaves still fighting the good fight, but it's a losing battle against the tides of money and history. 

We will welcome you all to Queens and the Bronx. 

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