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Notes From a Polite New Yorker: Sid Yiddish for President

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His platform includes heavy support of the arts. He would also buy everyone a new pair of shoes and hand out bubble gum with good comics in them, not the shabby comics that have become the standard today.

Sid Yiddish is a Chicago performance artist who is running for President as a write-in candidate. He describes himself as a "Lincoln Republican" though his politics are more in line with the Democrats, but you are welcome to write him in on whatever ballot you choose; he's not picky. He is the only candidate promising to invade Denmark. 

Why Denmark? "Because it's there and because I can," he said. He has performed in Denmark, but did his first show with Danish musicians over Skype for the Chicago Calling Festival in 2009. He travels the U.S. frequently. 

Sid Yiddish usually dresses like a kind of mischievous cantor, as if The Rocky Horror Picture Show took place in a Catskills summer camp or if Fiddler on the Roof was an avant-garde punk rock opera instead of a Broadway musical. With a prayer shawl and Kittel- a traditional garment worn by orthodox Jewish men and a face mask- he both pays homage to and satirizes Jewish heritage with his appearance. When he appeared on America's Got Talent, Howie Mandel called him a "Hasidic Lone Ranger."

A Sid Yiddish performance is always an eclectic ensemble of songs, poems, comedy and compelling noise. Each performance will usually involve some form of Tuvan throat singing, which sounds like it is painful to do and can rattle the uninitiated. He often performs with a band, the Candy Store Henchmen. With connections in various cities, his auxiliary of Candy Store Henchman can be summoned to perform on short notice and very little rehearsal.

[Full disclosure: I have known Sid Yiddish for several years and have performed in the New York City version of his Candy Store Henchmen. I met him through Mykel Board, who had the wisdom to write about Sid much sooner.]

His presidential campaign is his latest effort in reaching out to the world. His platform includes heavy support of the arts. "I believe schools should cut sports from schools and give all their money to the arts." He would also buy everyone a new pair of shoes and hand out bubble gum with good comics in them, not the shabby comics that have become the standard today. 

He has extended his reach through some small acting roles. He appears briefly in a Ludacris video and recently had a bit part in the Showtime show Shameless, which stars William H. Macy. There's an online petition to make Sid a recurring character on the series. 

While he revels in his outsider status, he makes an effort to make each show as interesting and participatory as possible, inviting audience members to join his band and play instruments if they choose, even if that instrumentation consists of banging on a table top or tapping a beer glass. 

He's devised a series of hand signals that instructs the band on what to play. One gesture means to stop, another gesture means a free-for-all, other gestures mean other things. If you play the wrong thing, he doesn't ask you to change, he just may be a bit more emphatic with his gestures. No two Sid Yiddish shows will ever be the same and he likes it that way. 

Sid Yiddish describes himself as a late bloomer and suffers from depression. His past is littered with sad memories of where clinical depression can lead. He hopes his work can reach people and help encourage those who also suffer from the disorder. To him, being a performance artist is a redeeming experience that puts him on a good path and colors his worldview. "It feels like I take LSD without taking LSD," he notes. 

His music and acting takes up a lot of his time, and he is interested in going to another audition for America's Got Talent. "I'm a renaissance man, a Jack and Jill of all trades. No one can put me in a category; you can't pin me down. But sometimes I've felt that I'm spreading myself too thin."

The world has given up a good bit of the civility and thoughtfulness that was more commonplace when Sid Yiddish was growing up, and he offers himself as a one-man protest against that. Instead of waving his fist at the world, his hand gestures conducts a motley crew making avant-garde punk rock symphony. He can take your rejection; he's faced it all before and just keeps coming back, serving as a reminder that the act of creation and expression is sometimes all that matters and all you have left. 

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